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FAQs: Spaying/Neutering or Caring for Your Cat

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Spaying or neutering your cat is one of the best things you can do to help your pet live a long, healthy life. Veterinarians can safely perform spay/neuter surgeries on cats as young as eight weeks. Learn all about the benefits of spay/neuter and check out this list of spay/neuter clinics in Cincinnati, Dayton, Northern Kentucky and Southeast Indiana.

It may take some experimenting to find out what food is right for your new cat. Whether you choose wet or dry food, check the label to be sure an animal-based protein is the primary ingredient. Other factors that come into play when choosing a cat food depend on your cat’s age, activity level and health. 

As far as how often you should feed your cat, usually kittens need more frequent feeding. Once they reach adulthood, feeding once a day is fine. Follow the cat food label for the amount of food per day based on your cat’s age and weight. And always consult your veterinarian if you have concerns about your cat’s diet.

It’s recommended to take your cat to the vet at least once a year for regular checkups and vaccinations. However, this can vary based on your cat’s age, health and specific needs. Keeping up on regular vet visits is the best way to maintain your cat’s well-being and catch any potential health issues early on.  

Kittens should start getting vaccinations when they are six to eight weeks old until they are about 16 weeks old. From there, they should be boosted every year. Adult cats usually get vaccinations every year or three years depending on how long the vaccine is designed to last. The vaccinations recommended for cats protect against rabies, panleukopenia (feline distemper), feline calicivirus and feline viral rhinotracheitis. Depending on how much your cat is outside and how often he or she is with other cats, you should talk to your vet about getting the feline leukemia and bordetella vaccinations as well.

Cats are naturally curious and sometimes chew or eat things they aren’t supposed to. Here’s a list of plants and foods that can be toxic to cats. If you think your cat may have ingested something potentially dangerous, contact your vet right away.

Plants that can be toxic:

  • Aloe plants
  • Autumn Crocus
  • Azaleas
  • Cyclamen 
  • Daffodils
  • Dieffenbachia
  • Hyacinth
  • Kalanchoe
  • Lilies 
  • Oleander
  • Poinsettias
  • Rhododendrons
  • Sago palms
  • Tulips

Foods that can be toxic: 

  • Raw fish
  • Caffeine
  • Chives
  • Chocolate
  • Garlic
  • Grapes
  • Onions
  • Raisins
  • Dog food
  • Milk or dairy products
  • Uncooked eggs

Regular brushing will keep your cat’s teeth healthy, but we know it isn’t always easy to do that.  Dental treats and toys designed to help control plaque and tartar can help maintain dental health. Plus, regular checkups with your vet are crucial for staying on top of your kitty’s oral health. If your cat seems to have constant bad breath or bleeding gums, consult your vet. These could be signs of a dental problem. 

If your cat ever is lost, having him or her microchipped definitely increases the chances of your pet being returned if found. Learn more about the benefits of microchipping your cat. If you live in Cincinnati, Dayton, Northern Kentucky or Southeast Indiana, check out our list of spay/neuter clinics that offer low-cost microchipping.
If you live in Cincinnati, Dayton, Northern Kentucky or Southeast Indiana, check out these organizations for low-cost spay/neuter and other medical services. You can also check out this national list of shelters to see if they have an on-site clinic or partner with a local veterinarian to provide affordable care.

Contact your local humane or rescue group for assistance. Many have pet food pantries or can provide you with resources to care for your cat if you are experiencing financial troubles.

If the reason for re-homing your cat is because of behavioral issues, consider talking to your veterinarian – or call us at 1-833-GIVE-TEN to talk to one of our animal experts. If it’s because of other reasons such as a life change, you can start by asking friends, family members or colleagues if they’re interested in adopting your cat. You can also try advertising responsibly about your cat online or on social media. List your pet on reputable websites or social media groups dedicated to pet adoptions, such as Home to Home. If you’re unable to find someone to adopt, contact a local shelter or rescue organization for help finding a safe home for your cat.
Spaying or neutering your cat is one of the best things you can do to help your pet live a long, healthy life. Veterinarians can safely perform spay/neuter surgeries on cats as young as eight weeks. Learn all about the benefits of spay/neuter and check out this list of spay/neuter clinics in Cincinnati, Dayton, Northern Kentucky and Southeast Indiana.

It may take some experimenting to find out what food is right for your new cat. Whether you choose wet or dry food, check the label to be sure an animal-based protein is the primary ingredient. Other factors that come into play when choosing a cat food depend on your cat’s age, activity level and health. 

As far as how often you should feed your cat, usually kittens need more frequent feeding. Once they reach adulthood, feeding once a day is fine. Follow the cat food label for the amount of food per day based on your cat’s age and weight. And always consult your veterinarian if you have concerns about your cat’s diet.

It’s recommended to take your cat to the vet at least once a year for regular checkups and vaccinations. However, this can vary based on your cat’s age, health and specific needs. Keeping up on regular vet visits is the best way to maintain your cat’s well-being and catch any potential health issues early on.

Kittens should start getting vaccinations when they are six to eight weeks old until they are about 16 weeks old. From there, they should be boosted every year. Adult cats usually get vaccinations every year or three years depending on how long the vaccine is designed to last. The vaccinations recommended for cats protect against rabies, panleukopenia (feline distemper), feline calicivirus and feline viral rhinotracheitis. Depending on how much your cat is outside and how often he or she is with other cats, you should talk to your vet about getting the feline leukemia and bordetella vaccinations as well.

Cats are naturally curious and sometimes chew or eat things they aren’t supposed to. Here’s a list of plants and foods that can be toxic to cats. If you think your cat may have ingested something potentially dangerous, contact your vet right away.

Plants that can be toxic:

  • Aloe plants
  • Autumn Crocus
  • Azaleas
  • Cyclamen 
  • Daffodils
  • Dieffenbachia
  • Hyacinth
  • Kalanchoe
  • Lilies 
  • Oleander
  • Poinsettias
  • Rhododendrons
  • Sago palms
  • Tulips

Foods that can be toxic: 

  • Raw fish
  • Caffeine
  • Chives
  • Chocolate
  • Garlic
  • Grapes
  • Onions
  • Raisins
  • Dog food
  • Milk or dairy products
  • Uncooked eggs

Regular brushing will keep your cat’s teeth healthy, but we know it isn’t always easy to do that.  Dental treats and toys designed to help control plaque and tartar can help maintain dental health. Plus, regular checkups with your vet are crucial for staying on top of your kitty’s oral health. If your cat seems to have constant bad breath or bleeding gums, consult your vet. These could be signs of a dental problem. 

If your cat ever is lost, having him or her microchipped definitely increases the chances of your pet being returned if found. Learn more about the benefits of microchipping your cat. If you live in Cincinnati, Dayton, Northern Kentucky or Southeast Indiana, check out our list of spay/neuter clinics that offer low-cost microchipping.
If you live in Cincinnati, Dayton, Northern Kentucky or Southeast Indiana, check out these organizations for low-cost spay/neuter and other medical services. You can also check out this national list of shelters to see if they have an on-site clinic or partner with a local veterinarian to provide affordable care.

Contact your local humane or rescue group for assistance. Many have pet food pantries or can provide you with resources to care for your cat if you are experiencing financial troubles.

If the reason for re-homing your cat is because of behavioral issues, consider talking to your veterinarian – or call us at 1-833-GIVE-TEN to talk to one of our animal experts. If it’s because of other reasons such as a life change, you can start by asking friends, family members or colleagues if they’re interested in adopting your cat. You can also try advertising responsibly about your cat online or on social media. List your pet on reputable websites or social media groups dedicated to pet adoptions, such as Home to Home. If you’re unable to find someone to adopt, contact a local shelter or rescue organization for help finding a safe home for your cat.

Didn't find your answer?

Call Scooter’s Help Center at 1-833-GIVE-TEN.

Animal experts are standing by.