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FAQs: Cat Training and Behavior Issues

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Start by selecting the right-sized litter box and filling it with litter. Make sure it’s easily accessible, but in a low-traffic area where your cat can have some privacy. If your cat is new to the litter box, start by placing it in a small, confined place, like a bathroom, where your cat spends a lot of time to help him or her get accustomed to using it more easily. Pay attention to your cat’s behavior and look for signs they may need to use the litter box, such as sniffing, circling or scratching the floor. When you notice these signs, gently place your cat in the litter box. You can also put your cat in the litter box after meals, playtime or when he or she first wakes up. When your cat uses the litter box correctly, praise your cat and offer treats. Avoid punishing your cat if he or she has an accident outside the box. With consistency and positive reinforcement, your cat will become a litter box pro. 

Cats can scratch for various reasons, including marking their territory, stretching or sharpening their claws. To deter your cat from scratching up furniture, get a scratching post or pad and encourage your cat to scratch it by placing their paws on it. Reward your cat with treats when he or she uses it. Trimming your cat’s nails can also help reduce your cat’s need to scratch.  Never get your cat declawed. This can lead to long-term pain, discomfort or other medical or behavioral issues. However, getting your cat spayed/neutered can help calm your cat and minimize destructive or aggressive behaviors.

Cats meow for several reasons. It may be a sign of boredom, hunger, loneliness or stress. Pay attention to when your cat meows to figure out what your pet may be trying to communicate to you. If this is a new behavior or your cat is meowing non-stop, it could be a sign your cat is in pain or isn’t feeling well. In that case, call your veterinarian to schedule a checkup.

Cats that consistently eat, chew or consume inedible materials like cardboard, fabric, paper, rubber, soil and wood is a behavior commonly referred to as “pica.” Pica can be caused by anxiety, stress, boredom or compulsion. It also can be due to early weaning or lack of socialization in younger cats. You can help curb pica that stems from boredom or anxiety by providing mental and physical activity with toys and games. Try to minimize chances of ingestion by keeping plastic and other items they tend to chew out of reach. For additional assistance, consult your vet or call us at 1-833-GIVE-TEN to speak to an animal expert. 

If your cat isn’t spayed/neutered, they could be escaping to find other cats to get frisky with. Getting your cat spayed/neutered should lessen his or her desire to leave home. If your cat is an indoor cat, make sure all doors and windows are secure and have screens to prevent your cat from slipping away. Also, creating an enriching indoor environment with toys and scratching posts will keep your cat mentally stimulated and content at home.

The best thing you can do to help prevent your cat from spraying indoors is get your pet spayed/neutered. Cats spray to mark their territory and to signal to other cats they’re ready to mate. If your cat is spayed/neutered, some other reasons for spaying can include: a change has taken place, they don’t like their litter, there is a conflict with other cats in the home or your cat could have an urinary tract infection or other medical issue.

Losing your cat can be scary, but don’t worry, there is hope to finding your pet. To help, check out our step-by-step guide on how to find a lost cat.

Having your cat spayed/neutered can help reduce your cat’s aggressive behavior with other cats or animals. If your cat is spayed/neutered and continues fighting, try to identify what triggers them. It can include territorial disputes, resource guarding, fear or feeling threatened. If your cat is fighting with another cat in your home, give them some space or separate areas to decompress. Ensure they each have their own food and water bowls, litter boxes and toys. Keep your cat mentally and physically stimulated to help release any pent-up energy. If aggressive behavior persists, seek advice from your vet or call us at 1-833-GIVE-TEN to talk to one of our animal experts.

Start by selecting the right-sized litter box and filling it with litter. Make sure it’s easily accessible, but in a low-traffic area where your cat can have some privacy. If your cat is new to the litter box, start by placing it in a small, confined place, like a bathroom, where your cat spends a lot of time to help him or her get accustomed to using it more easily. Pay attention to your cat’s behavior and look for signs they may need to use the litter box, such as sniffing, circling or scratching the floor. When you notice these signs, gently place your cat in the litter box. You can also put your cat in the litter box after meals, playtime or when he or she first wakes up. When your cat uses the litter box correctly, praise your cat and offer treats. Avoid punishing your cat if he or she has an accident outside the box. With consistency and positive reinforcement, your cat will become a litter box pro.

Cats can scratch for various reasons, including marking their territory, stretching or sharpening their claws. To deter your cat from scratching up furniture, get a scratching post or pad and encourage your cat to scratch it by placing their paws on it. Reward your cat with treats when he or she uses it. Trimming your cat’s nails can also help reduce your cat’s need to scratch.  Never get your cat declawed. This can lead to long-term pain, discomfort or other medical or behavioral issues. However, getting your cat spayed/neutered can help calm your cat and minimize destructive or aggressive behaviors.

Bringing a new cat home is exciting, but can be a little stressful for your new little family member. It may take a few days or even a few months for your new cat to feel comfortable in his or her new home. To help make the transition as smooth as possible, check out this article with a timeline on how to introduce a new cat.

Cats meow for several reasons. It may be a sign of boredom, hunger, loneliness or stress. Pay attention to when your cat meows to figure out what your pet may be trying to communicate to you. If this is a new behavior or your cat is meowing non-stop, it could be a sign your cat is in pain or isn’t feeling well. In that case, call your veterinarian to schedule a checkup.

Cats that consistently eat, chew or consume inedible materials like cardboard, fabric, paper, rubber, soil and wood is a behavior commonly referred to as “pica.” Pica can be caused by anxiety, stress, boredom or compulsion. It also can be due to early weaning or lack of socialization in younger cats. You can help curb pica that stems from boredom or anxiety by providing mental and physical activity with toys and games. Try to minimize chances of ingestion by keeping plastic and other items they tend to chew out of reach. For additional assistance, consult your vet or call us at 1-833-GIVE-TEN to speak to an animal expert.

If your cat isn’t spayed/neutered, they could be escaping to find other cats to get frisky with. Getting your cat spayed/neutered should lessen his or her desire to leave home. If your cat is an indoor cat, make sure all doors and windows are secure and have screens to prevent your cat from slipping away. Also, creating an enriching indoor environment with toys and scratching posts will keep your cat mentally stimulated and content at home.

The best thing you can do to help prevent your cat from spraying indoors is get your pet spayed/neutered. Cats spray to mark their territory and to signal to other cats they’re ready to mate. If your cat is spayed/neutered, some other reasons for spaying can include: a change has taken place, they don’t like their litter, there is a conflict with other cats in the home or your cat could have an urinary tract infection or other medical issue.

Losing your cat can be scary, but don’t worry, there is hope to finding your pet. To help, check out our step-by-step guide on how to find a lost cat.

Having your cat spayed/neutered can help reduce your cat’s aggressive behavior with other cats or animals. If your cat is spayed/neutered and continues fighting, try to identify what triggers them. It can include territorial disputes, resource guarding, fear or feeling threatened. If your cat is fighting with another cat in your home, give them some space or separate areas to decompress. Ensure they each have their own food and water bowls, litter boxes and toys. Keep your cat mentally and physically stimulated to help release any pent-up energy. If aggressive behavior persists, seek advice from your vet or call us at 1-833-GIVE-TEN to talk to one of our animal experts.

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